How Much Slang is Too Much?

How Much Slang is Too Much?

One of the major characters in my book, TIME EXPOSURE,  is Alexander Gardner, a famous, and real, Civil War photographer.  Gardner hailed from Paisley, Scotland and arrived in Washington, D.C. in 1856 with a thick Scottish accent.  How was I to handle dialogue?  I wanted to make sure that the reader knew Gardner was from Scotland.  So, I added a bit of dialect.  Check this out:

“I must speak to ye, Joseph.”  Gardener took a deep breath.  “I’ve had a special offer I must consider.  Mind ye now, it doesna preclude my maintaining an association with Brady.  But, I want ye to be part of me decision.”

I also sprinkled in lots of dinnas, shouldnas, couldnas, ayes, me for my, etc.  Ugh.  The reader couldn’t possibly forget that Gardner was from Scotland.  Or care.  He’d already given up on the book.

Thanks to my critique group my eyes were open to this dialect dilemma.  I began to notice it in other novels.  Too much of an accent:  “How vould you vant me to wote?”

Or overuse of slang: “He needs to mellow out, he’s bonkers and that’s too dicey for this girl.”

Or clichéd idiomatic expressions : “Once in a blue moon, we see eye to eye, but you’re usually on the fence, which only adds insult to injury.”

Eeek.  The use of “casual” spelling such as lemme, or gimme, can be used . . . sparingly.  Dropping “g” for a word ending in “ing” gets tiresome too if used every other sentence.  We have to give the reader credit and assume that by dropping a slang word, accent or expression in, they’ll get the point and as they continue to read that character’s dialogue, they’ll naturally hear the dialect.

Some of the worst examples of overusing dialect can be seen when characters have southern or New York accents.  Like the use of “Ah” for “I” or “y’all for, well, you know.   Then there’s the exaggerated Brooklynese – “toidy-toid and toid street” or “poils for the goils.” (These may actually need translation!)  I grew up in Brooklyn and, frankly, you do hear this.  It’s one thing, however, to add it to a movie, where you can hear the character say it.  It’s another to read it in a book ad nauseum.

So how do you get the character’s geographical location, or educational background across?  The best way is through the rhythm of the dialogue and the words you choose.  One “aye” from my Scotsman and the reader hears his accent through the rest of the dialogue.  To portray a well-educated German you might avoid contractions and use the full words to make the speech more formal sounding: “I should not bother with that if I were you.  Do you not think so?”

In the end, you need to do your homework.  Learn the true dialect, accent, slang expressions of the region your characters come from, both geographically and historically.  Depending upon the time period, speech was often more formal than we’re used to today.

Practice on yourself.  Once you know how the dialect really sounds have your character try it out in dialogue in a scene.  Read it aloud.  Very important, to really hear the effect, you must read it out loud.  You’ll find you will most likely want to eliminate all but a smidgen of the dialect.  What will be left is the essence of your character.

Then fuhgeddaboudit!

Travel Will Make You a Better Writer.

Travel Will Make You a Better Writer.

As a writer, being observant of your surroundings is paramount in creating an authentic environment. I wanted to share one of my travel experiences with you to illustrate what I mean.

Several years ago, I spent two weeks traveling in the Pacific Northwest.  Starting in Canada and ending in the U.S., I found myself anxious to start scribbling ideas for a future book.  The settings were amazing, from large, modern cities, to small, more manageable ones.  From dense rain forests to rocky coastlines.  From museums, to sky towers, to suspension bridges and ziplines, the backdrops are there for a new book.

But just as important as settings, were the people.   We’re all familiar with the concept, true or not, that often people resemble their dogs (or vice versa.)  Well, I can testify to the fact that people “resemble” the place they live in.

In cities like Vancouver, BC, I noticed that people were more formally dressed (at least the working locals.)  They had sharp edges to their clothes, suits, shoes, just like the tall, glass, high-rises of the downtown.  They didn’t meet your eye as they brushed past you in the street (much like NYC, where I grew up.)

Victoria, BC, was quite a bit different.  Without the tall skyscrapers, people seemed more intent on immediate surroundings, including nodding at passersby.  The buildings were shorter and stouter and had a very British feel.  So did the locals.  You can take that to mean whatever you like.

From Canada we ferried across to Washington and then drove to Olympic National Park.  Amazing crystal clear lakes, thick and tall evergreen forests that blocked out the sun, and myriad green colors that could shame Scotland.  Most folks were travelers like us so we couldn’t discern any particular likeness to the environment.  Oddly, the few natives seemed to not know much about other parts of the Park.  So they worked and played in one area only.  I guess, like the grand old trees, they are rooted to one spot.

From the wilderness we ferried back to big city: this time Seattle.  Much bigger and more built up than I remembered from visits twenty years ago.  Almost overpowering in downtown now, with giant skyscrapers of glass and stone.  Still, there was the old, more comfortable feel of its former, smaller self.  Seattle has so many attractions, it’s hard to pick and choose.  The Pacific Science Center was a dear old friend from my museum days, but we didn’t visit this time.  Instead we went to the Chihuly Glass Museum and Garden.  OMG.  Words can barely describe the beauty.

Again, it was hard to gauge the people since many were from other places.  But I think it’s safe to say that Seatte-ites are a bit cool, aloof, and keep to themselves, what with huddling under umbrellas and all.  Many carry a Starbucks coffee cup, however, which is no surprise.

And finally, we took Amtrak to Portland, Oregon.  Portland was a cozy, warm and friendly town, with lots of environmentally friendly businesses and people.  And then there’s Powell’s Bookstore, of course.  The most amazing place to spend some hours (days, even.)  They were nice enough to set out my bookmarks!

Portlanders like to chat.  They like to smile, despite the often gloomy weather.  And they have the greatest ice cream shop in the world.  “Salt and Straw,” where you can get a cone of salty, caramel ribbon ice cream.  My kind of people, indeed.

The next time you travel, study the setting, study the history and architecture, wildlife, museums, galleries, and gardens.  And study the people.  They could be the inspiration for your next characters.

Writer–Be Wary of the First Five Pages

Writer–Be Wary of the First Five Pages

I had a surprising experience recently when I received the following review on my book, Pure Lies: “False Deception – I thought it was historical fiction. It’s just a sex thriller. I stopped after the first chapter. No thank you!”

I actually had to go back and read the prologue (not the first chapter) to see what the reviewer meant.  Sex thriller?  Did I actually write a sex thriller?  For those of you unfamiliar with this mystery, it is about greed and depravity as underlying motivation for the Salem witch trials.  And, as in all my novels, it is unraveled by modern technology years or, in this case, centuries later.

The last two paragraphs of the prologue depict a church deacon and a young woman committing a “sin” but it is wholly in the context of the story and lays the foundation for one of the villains in the story to show their true character.  Or so I thought.

Pure Lies was the winner of the San Diego Book Awards for Best Published Mystery, Sisters in Crime in 2014 and has excellent reviews.  It is historical fiction on one hand, and modern crime-solving on the other.  Is it a cozy?  No.  But a sex thriller?

Naturally, every reader is entitled to their opinion. I’ve read “real” sex thrillers, and this review seemed far off the mark.  But then I’m biased.

As a writer, it reminds me how important those first few pages are . . . to each individual reader.  We need to consider our readers, but we have to be true to our writing.  Would this opening scene to my book have been better without the “sin?”  I think not.

Your ideas are welcome.

 

Details, Details

Details, Details

It’s not easy keeping track of details in a novel that goes back and forth in time.  Or any book of fiction, for that matter.  What do I mean by details?

Details relative to the characters could mean simple and obvious characteristics such as eye and hair color, height, weight and age, gender, dress style, likes and dislikes, personality quirks, language and speech mannerisms.  Believe it or not, it’s not always easy to remember all of these unless your characters re-appear in several books.  I keep a list of all these traits for each of my characters.  In fact, for each book that my main characters appear, I re-visit the list to make sure I’ve aged them appropriately.  Even a year off will throw your readers into a tizzy.

More important, when dealing with generations of families, or when you go back in history to another time period, chart your way through the years, decades, or centuries involved.  Ancestry maps can be helpful.

Deadly Provenance goes back to World War II with the “grandparents.”  In modern time, the “parents” and “grandchildren” are featured.  It’s vital to have all those years mapped out.  How old were the grandparents in the 1940s?  How old are the parents now?  The grandchildren?  When did they marry?  Who did they marry?  Trust me, it’s confusing if you just wing it.  Your reader will definitely notice that the parents could not possibly have been born if the grandparents were already dead.

Another detail to be meticulous about and I must say I have been remiss in an early book, is language and speech.  If a character is from Boston, don’t give him a Brooklyn accent or use an expression that is idiomatic to the wrong region.  Same goes for dialect, and, by the way, don’t use too much of it.  It’s distracting.

If you use foreign language phrases, please, please, make them correct.  A Google translation will give you the basic words, but is the phrasing correct?  Do the French, Germans, Slavs, Poles, speak like that?  Make it authentic.  Ask someone who speaks the language.

Even small details like what flowers bloom when and where are important.  In a recent review of my book, Pure Lies, a reader reminded me that lilacs grow in May in New England.  I’d had their scent wafting through the air in July.  Wrong.

It takes time to get the details correct, but in the end, your work will be far more authentic.  And your reader will thank you for it.

Ideas welcome.

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Quick!  Turn the Page!

Quick! Turn the Page!

“Amanda stepped off the elevator on the lower level of the parking garage.  At ten o’clock on a Saturday night, the level was empty except for her car . . . and one other she didn’t recognize.  A sound of dripping water and the soft scurrying of animal feet – rats? – made her throat close. 

She swiveled her head in search of anything or anyone nearby then took a tentative step toward her car.  Then another step and faster, faster, until she was almost at a sprint.  Her high heels clicked on the concrete floor and echoed in the cavernous space.  Finally, she reached her car.  Damn, why didn’t she have her keys ready? 

Amanda fumbled through her bag, her heart now ratcheted up, pumping blood through her ears.  All she could hear was the furious whooshing sound of her own fear.

There, her keys, at the bottom, now in her hand.  She clicked the fob and the latches opened.  She reached for the handle, but before her fingers closed around it, she detected a breathy squeak of rubber soled shoes behind her.  She dropped her bag, swung around with a gasp, hands clenched into fists, ready to defend herself and  . . .”

So, what do you think?  Tension?  I always love the late-at-night parking garage scene.  Scares the heck out of me, even now.

What is tension, really, and why is it so important in writing? Even if you’re not writing a mystery.  Even if you’re writing non-fiction.

The noun tension has its Latin roots in “tendere,” which means to stretch, and tension occurs when something is stretched either physically or emotionally to its limits.  Strained relations between countries can cause political tensions to rise.  Tension can be added to a rubber band by stretching it to its limits.  By the way, you can release nervous tension by shooting that rubber band at the local bully.

Tension is the means to get your reader to turn the page, particularly if it’s used at the end of a chapter as a cliffhanger.  People, for the most part, don’t like to leave things unresolved.  They want to find the solution, even if it’s an unsatisfactory one (that’s another story.) 

While you cannot (or should not) distort facts when writing non-fiction, tension around real events can ramp up the readers’ pulse just as thrillers can.  Take “The Monuments Men,” for instance.  How tense can a situation be when you have a group of men and women trying to save the art and monuments of a Europe at war?  When, finally the fighting ends, and they discover, in a dark, damp mine in Austria, a cache of hidden loot that would make King Midas gasp?  When, they manage to “derail” an art train bound for Germany with stolen paintings of Masters like Leonardo.

Now that’s tension.  That’s real life.  Whew.

I welcome your feedback and samples of tension in your writing.

When You’re Stuck, Murder Someone

When You’re Stuck, Murder Someone

Writing mysteries is a “flexible” process and as an author I must be tuned-in and willing to make changes . . . often serious changes.  Throw out chapters, throw out characters, add new locations, scenes.  Pump up the senses: add fragrances, colors, cacophonous sounds.

I often reach a sticking point around the middle of the novel, which leads me to inject a “turn of events” into the story.  This turn of events is often not planned, but gives the story a much-needed jolt.

In my current book, there are two NYPD homicide detectives, one in the past and one in the present.  Both are following leads in a murder case (as detectives are wont to do.)  Each lead spins off other leads, but in the end, the leads peter out (as my brain does) and they are left, frustrated, and wondering what the next step might be.

When this happens to me, I simply just murder someone.  What? you say.  It’s as simple as that.  Murder someone.

Now, this “someone” absolutely must have relevance to the story.  Please don’t bring in your next-door neighbor unless they’ve had a role in the story already.  In addition, there must be a darn good reason to kill this someone off.  If it’s your neighbor, the old “fence dispute” doesn’t cut it.

Yes, a fresh murder can get the readers’ (and writer’s) mind spinning in new directions.  What did I miss?  Why didn’t I see that coming?  If X is now dead, she couldn’t have been the culprit.

A mid-novel murder is always good to keep readers on their toes, working to figure out the mystery.  That’s the point.  I write mysteries.  The longer I can keep my readers baffled and confounded about what’s really going on, the more enjoyable the read.

Ideas welcome.