A Glimpse Into the Art World

A Glimpse Into the Art World

I thought I would share a brief “behind-the-scenes” tour of my most popular book to date, Deadly Provenance.  

Originally titled Provenance (until a friend thought readers might confuse it with a city in Rhode Island,) Deadly Provenance is about the confiscation of art during WWII and a missing Van Gogh painting.  “Still Life: Vase with Oleanders” is an actual painting by Vincent, which disappeared around 1944, and is, in fact, still missing.

The research on this book provided so many possible avenues to explore, it’s hard to know where to begin; thus, my plan is to write several blogs.  First, there’s the Nazi confiscation of art, how it happened, who was involved, and why?  Next, what happened to all that displaced art?  How much was recovered and how?  How much is still missing?  Then there’s my world — the museum world.  How have museums been involved?  Have they helped or hindered the search for missing pieces of art?

An important character in the historic part of the book is Rose Valland, a woman whose heroic efforts during the war truly saved a great deal of artwork.  She is portrayed as the heroine she truly was.  In the film, Monuments Men, Cate Blanchette played her character, but looked nothing like her as you can see from the photo here.

Like Rose, another real character in history is Hans van Meegeren, art forger extraordinaire.  Van Meegeren, a Dutch painter, bamboozled the art world in the 40s with a series of false Vermeers.  Did he ever forge a van Gogh?  In my book he did.

On another front, the book brings up a hypothetical situation where the protagonist, Maggie Thornhill, a digital photographer, must try to identify and authenticate the painting from a photograph.  Can it be done?  Has it ever been done?  What is the science of art authentication today?  How are x-rays, infrared and multi-spectral imaging used in scientific analysis?  Don’t freak.  I won’t get into this too deeply, I promise.

Confiscated degenerate art stored at Jeu de Paume. Photo: Archives des Musees Nationaux

I often visit the places I write about.  During WWII, a great deal of art was stolen and stored in the Room of Martyrs at the Musée du Jeu de Paume in Paris.  The museum is located on the west side of the Tuileries

Gardens and is now a museum of Contemporary Art.  Visiting was a treat, although the “Room” is no longer there.   Most of the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works originally housed there are now on display at the Musée d’Orsay, on the banks of the Seine, in an old converted railway station.

And last, is Vincent van Gogh, the mad genius whose painting is lost, perhaps forever.  “Vase with Oleanders” is not typical of his vibrant colors, his wheat fields or his starry nights.  But there’s no doubt this is Vincent’s work, even if his signature wasn’t in the lower left corner of the painting.  Which it is.

Deadly Provenance gave me a glimpse into the art world and I enjoyed creating a mystery against this backdrop.  The book made it to the front page of San Diego Union-Tribune and also to NPR radio.

Unfortunately, Vase With Oleanders is still missing today, as are many precious pieces of art stolen during WWII.

Perhaps you might check in your attic . . . just in case.