Are You the Best Editor for Your Work?

Are You the Best Editor for Your Work?

Should You Hire a Pro?

A writer friend asked me whether it was really a good idea to pay a professional editor to read her manuscript.  My immediate response was yes, but the question made me pause and reflect on my personal experiences.

I have had all six of my novels (number six coming this summer!) edited by pros.  Here are my thoughts.

There is huge value to editors who “copy” edit, that is, they read for spelling, grammar, syntax, etc.  You always miss something: a comma where it doesn’t belong, the incorrect use of a semicolon.  In terms of the broader picture: the plot, characters, structure, tension, conflict, on and on, the pro can be very helpful. . . or not.

In The Triangle Murders, the professional editor I hired was so intrigued with the historic story that her suggestions would have made me totally change the book.  It would have become a historic mystery rather than a historic mystery that is solved today with modern technology.  She had her own vision for the book.  But who was writing this?

The editor I hired for my Civil War book, however, was extremely helpful.  He gave me an idea for a dynamite ending that I hadn’t even considered.  It totally changed the story for the better.

Before you consider hiring a pro, however, do your own self-editing.  Believe it or not, there is a lot you can do to improve your writing before it gets the going-over by someone else.  Some suggestions:

Edit in small sections at a time.  If possible, reread the section before and then edit the current 5 to 10 pages.

Also, read aloud (or to your dog or cat.)  I can’t emphasize enough how important this is.  You’d be surprised what you hear that you didn’t think you wrote.  Dialogue may sound stilted, tension weak, setting inappropriate.  Often I will come away from my reading out loud thinking, ugh, did I write that?

Some things to look for when you’re self-editing:

  1. Do you want to turn the page?
  2. Did you stumble over awkward phrases or clunky words when you read aloud?
  3. Were you confused by your own plot twists?
  4. Did punctuation mess up your reading?
  5. Were your characters boring, too flawed (yes, that’s possible) or totally unbelievable (unless you write Bourne thrillers)?
  6. Were there plot inconsistencies ie: a character appeared after she was murdered?
  7. Were there setting inconsistencies? It was hot as Hades one day, snowing the next?
  8. Did you get your facts right? Very important if you want authenticity.

You can be your own best editor.  But, just to be sure — reread, rewrite, read aloud.  And again x 3.

Now hire a professional for the final read.

Your thoughts welcome.

 

Launching Book 6: Hart of Madness

Launching Book 6: Hart of Madness

Hart Island is a small island located in the Long Island Sound,

off the coast of the Bronx, in New York City.

It has been a public mass burial ground,

a colossal “potter’s field” for a million souls since 1869.

The crumbling remains of its buildings once served as:

a Union Civil War prison camp,

a tuberculosis sanatorium,

a boys’ reformatory and . . .

a woman’s lunatic asylum.

 

1902, New York City: Nineteen-year-old Ruby Hunt comes home to her Park Avenue apartment to find her family murdered.  She is the prime suspect in these gruesome crimes but instead of being placed under arrest, Ruby is committed to an insane asylum for life.The insane asylum is located on Hart Island, just off the coast of the Bronx.  The island has served as the city’s largest potter’s field since the mid-1800s.  Over a million lost souls are buried there.

Ruby’s life has irrevocably changed.  Her only hope is a kindly caretaker at the asylum and a handsome young rookie police detective with the NYPD.

Detective Liam McCarty is convinced Ruby is innocent and sets out to prove it with the help of investigative reporter Nellie Bly, whose experience in an insane asylum makes her the perfect partner. Time is running out, however, because Ruby’s treatments are becoming increasingly debilitating.  If Liam doesn’t rescue her in time, she will be scheduled for a lobotomy.

2016, New York City: A descendant of Ruby’s uncle is murdered and homicide detective Frank Mead soon realizes that the connection between Ruby’s case and his current murder is inescapable.  It won’t be the first time Frank has solved a cold case from the distant past to resolve today’s crime.

Digging into the Hunt family is no easy task.  Each relative has something to hide and unless Frank can uncover the killer soon, there will be more murders. Using the latest in forensic technology, Frank enlists the help of digital photo expert, Maggie Thornhill, to match photos found in an old suitcase passed down by Ruby’s descendants.  Along with handwriting analysis and ballistics, Frank is able to piece together the puzzle that spans over a hundred years.

 

Watch for premiere summer 2018.

Conflict: A Crucial Element to a Story

Conflict: A Crucial Element to a Story

A young friend, beginning her first foray into fiction writing, asked me: “What is conflict in a novel?”  I thought I’d take a stab at an answer.

The simplified dictionary definition is: “A conflict is a struggle or an opposition.”Conflict comes from the Latin word for “striking,” but it isn’t always violent. Conflict can arise from opposing ideas. If your character is torn between two different desires, say, marrying a woman who lives in Boston, but dying to take a job offer in Saskatoon (where is that, anyway?) he’s conflicted.

Conflict is key to your characters’ relationships.  If everyone gets along beautifully and there are no differences of opinions, arguments, debates, fisticuffs . . . no screaming, pulling hair, beating up or murdering someone, well, there’s not much conflict.  And not much interest.

Conflict can occur within a person’s mind.  This is the most interesting of conflicts and defines the character’s character, if you will.  When a character confronts another character, there is drama.  When a character confronts his/her own self, there is drama plus.  Now, the stage is set for future interactions with everyone he/she meets.

In The Triangle Murders, my protagonist, Frank Mead is overwhelmingly conflicted about his relationship with his daughter, whom he feels he has abandoned after his wife’s suicide.  The daughter feels similarly.  However, circumstances bring the two of them together, creating not only conflict, but often tension.  There is great strain between them and the reader must wonder if it will ever be resolved.

Emotions play a large role in portraying a character’s conflict.  If a character keeps his emotions hidden, any conflicts he faces may stretch these hidden emotions to a breaking point.  As a reader we need to know what’s happening in his head – how this conflict is affecting him.  We also need to see how it manifests itself in his behavior.  Does serious money problems cause him to drink more, beat his wife and kids, or retreat further into himself?  How your character handles conflict makes him unique . . . or not.  Unique is better, by the way.

Conflict between characters can take many forms.  It can be job-related, school- related, socially-related, sexually-related, family-related, or other (everything else) -related.  Often all.  However, too many conflicts in too many places can cause the reader to get worn out.  Give your character, even a cranky one, at least one amiable relationships, even if it’s with another cranky character, please, or we won’t like him very much.

I like to find new ways to help my characters resolve their conflicts.  For instance, in Frank’s case above, he enlists his daughter’s help to solve an ancient murder.  They form a tentative truce to accomplish this, which may, or may not, last into another book.

My advice is to maximize the use of conflict in your story.  It is a great tool to keep readers turning the page.

As always, I welcome your feedback.

“Foodie” Lit

“Foodie” Lit

My Civil War mystery, Time Exposure, was recently reviewed by Susan Weintrob, who hosts a site called Expand the Table: https://www.expandthetable.net/foodie-lit. In it she blogs about “Foodie Lit,” a genre of novels and memoirs filled with stories and food.  Each month she shares the magic of a good foodie lit read and one of its recipes to pair with it.

Cooking and recipes in books takes us into the mind of the characters and brings us into the book’s kitchen to see, smell, and share the lives within.

I wanted to share an excerpt of her Foodie Lit review of Time Exposure.

The Gibbs Museum in Charleston, South Carolina mounted an exhibit of Civil War photographs, which I went to see a few years ago. The black and white photographs were clear and surprisingly modern. There was the heroic; there were also the photographs that were brutal, unnerving and full of war’s agony. There was the view of Robert E. Lee’s home, with Union soldiers on the porch, his property made into the now national cemetery at Arlington.

Lynne Kennedy’s Civil War historical novel, Time Exposure, is seen through the lens of photographers, the first time that civilians are on the war fields to photograph warfare.

Lynne, once a museum director, had attended a workshop on Civil War Photography at her museum. And she told me that she became hooked on the subject. “After much research about Civil War photography, I chose a real CW photographer, Alexander Gardner, who worked under Mathew Brady before he set up his own shop. I also fictionalized a photographer for story purposes: Joseph Thornhill. His descendant, Maggie would, 140 years later, become involved with his mysterious death.”

We see the scenes of war literally through Joseph and his lens. As modern readers, we know more about war details than those in the Civil War era. Yet the descriptions still send chills to us, as we contemplate this deeply divisive war, some divides that last until today. 

Joseph to his fiancé, “Fences are down, rails blackened and burnt, orphaned children wander hungry and homeless, begging for food from strangers.”

Photographs were exhibited during the war.  Joseph watches the crowds that come to his gallery. “They gaped at the images so powerfully depicting the brutal nature of war. Ladies, dressed in their finest, with parasols folded at their sides gasped at the scenes, covered their eyes from one horror only to come to face with another death scene.”

Lynne said to me, “Photography hugely impacted the way society viewed the war.  Through the photographs, the public got up close and personal to the horrid battleground landscapes…that they may otherwise have only imagined.”

Louisa May Alcott enters the novel as a friend of Thornhill’s fiancé. In real life, the beloved author of Little Women volunteered as a nurse in Washington and wrote a series of sketches about her experience.

The author includes scenes of Gettysburg, the most brutal Civil War battle. Thornhill tells his companion photographer, Alex Gardner, “You know Alex? Men get to know each other pretty well in this sort of experience, being confined so closely together. Living together, working together, freezing together for more than a year.  Some form bonds that will last a lifetime.”

The author writes eloquently of the mundane and the philosophical. Kennedy has much experience writing in this genre. She draws us into the very fabric of life in another era, allowing us to view events in the Civil War era that so dramatically influenced our country, even to this day.

During the Civil War, a favorite sweet side or dessert was Fried Apples. In the field, it was typically made in a cast iron pan over a fire and worked well with tart apples or ripe, if available. A variety of sweeteners could be used from honey or brown sugar, more available than white at the time.

At the end of each Foodie Lit review the reader is tempted by a recipe that complements the story.  For Time Exposure: Buttery Fried Nutmeg Apples.  https://www.expandthetable.net/fried-apples

Enjoy!

Turn the Page

Turn the Page

Chapter endings are as important as beginnings.  Read the endings of your chapters.  Go ahead.  Are they riveting? Are you anxious to turn the page? Will your readers be?  Take a closer look at the ho hum ones and begin to focus on endings that would compel a reader to keep going.

I skimmed through some books to see how those authors ended their chapters.  Here’s one from Deception Point by Dan Brown. “Rachel felt weightless for an instant, hovering over the multimillion-pound block of ice.  Then they were riding the iceberg down – plummeting into the frigid sea.”  The reader is not likely to put the book down at this point, at least until they find out what happened to Rachel and her friend.  Brown could have ended with something like: “Rachel stood motionless on the block of ice and prayed the block wouldn’t fall into the sea.”  Nah.

Here’s another.  “Emergency Room.  Code Blue.  Susan ran for the elevator.”  This is from Chelsea Cain’s The Night Season.  What if Cain had stopped at Code Blue?  Would it have the same impact as her running for the elevator?

I believe this idea of compelling endings is not only important for fiction but for non-fiction as well.  Take Laura Hillenbrand’s Unbroken: “Sometime that day, or perhaps the day before, he had taken off his uniform, picked up a sack of rice, slipped into the Naoetsu countryside, and vanished.”  Vanishing, dying, running, falling, are all great ways to end a chapter on a high, cliffhanger note.

How about this from my mystery, Time Exposure: “As he sank to his knees, he lifted his head to gaze up at the Blackhawk.  Captain Geoffrey Farrell smiled down at him.  A boot to the head put him out.”  Or this from Pure Lies, in the form of dialogue: “Well, you may be nuts and I wouldn’t testify to this in court, but between you, me and the microscope, honey, these signatures were all written by the same person.”

Scene endings can follow this rule to some extent, but it might get tiresome if every scene did.  I think you have to let the reader rest once in a while and catch up with the action.

Not all chapter endings must end on an action note either.  Many can end with inner conflict or conflict between characters.  Gives the chapter tension.  What happens between these two people next?  Does Anna May leave her husband?  Does mom throw Maynard out of the house?  Does little Davey start to cry?  Is Barbara in danger of being fired, of losing her health insurance, of missing a plane to an important event?   If you care about the characters, you will turn the page.

I’d love to hear some chapter endings you think are great . . . or terrible.  When we can recognize what works and what doesn’t, our writing benefits in the long-run.